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Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg



Articles by Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg

An Interview with Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg

December 15, 2020

This week in Say More, PS talks with Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg, Professor of Economics at Yale University and a former World Bank Group chief economist.

Project Syndicate: You recently observed that women’s careers have suffered disproportionately during the pandemic, and argued for flexible work schedules and free childcare to help women in the longer term. But what about the short term? As you note, “job losses during downturns have long-lasting effects, because the unemployed tend to lose relevant job skills and professional connections over time.” For example, women in academia have reported a significant decrease in manuscript submissions – a lapse that can put them significantly behind their male colleagues. Are there

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What COVID Is Costing Women

November 19, 2020

Without a greater focus on the gender dynamics of the COVID-19 crisis, women and girls will suffer long-term handicaps that constrain their economic prospects for years to come, if not permanently. We already know enough about the pandemic’s gendered effects to justify implementing far-reaching policy reforms.

NEW HAVEN – Although COVID-19 infections and deaths are surging in many parts of the world, recent announcements of apparently successful vaccine trials have offered a light at the end of the tunnel. One hopes we can soon redirect our attention from the urgent need to save lives to the longer-term costs of the pandemic, not least those being borne disproportionately by women.

Europe

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To revive the World Bank, China and the United States need to work together

November 5, 2020

Background: The World Bank has always been a complex institution trying to balance the diverse needs and priorities of its member countries and its shareholders. As the last quarter of 2020 approaches, the World Bank faces global challenges (pandemic, increasing poverty, climate change) amidst a gradually deglobalizing world. Tensions between two of its major shareholders, the United States and China, have cast doubt on the future of global trade and multilateral cooperation. The runup to the 2020 US presidential election has added to this uncertainty, though regardless of the outcome, there does appear to be bipartisan support for turning inward, cutting ties to China, and reshoring economic activities.
The current policy environment in combination with the pandemic—and against the

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Memo to the World Bank on rethinking its relationship with China and providing trade advice for developing countries

November 5, 2020

Background: The World Bank has always been a complex institution trying to balance the diverse needs and priorities of its member countries and its shareholders. As the last quarter of 2020 approaches, the World Bank faces global challenges (pandemic, increasing poverty, climate change) amidst a gradually deglobalizing world. Tensions between two of its major shareholders, the United States and China, have cast doubt on the future of global trade and multilateral cooperation. The runup to the 2020 US presidential election has added to this uncertainty, though regardless of the outcome, there does appear to be bipartisan support for turning inward, cutting ties to China, and reshoring economic activities.
The current policy environment in combination with the pandemic—and against the

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How Poverty Reduction Can Survive Deglobalization

September 17, 2020

By sharply curtailing international trade, the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated a trend that was already underway. It is now more important than ever for developing countries to seek alternatives to export-led growth.

NEW HAVEN – The COVID-19 pandemic seems to have curtailed globalization in ways that the current US administration could scarcely have dreamed up even a year ago. But, viewed in a broader context, this year’s retreat from globalization is merely the latest chapter in an ongoing process that has left the developing world increasingly pessimistic about pursuing export-driven growth as a path out of poverty.

The Roots of American Misery

PS OnPoint

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Keep Borders Open

July 17, 2020

One of the best ways for advanced economies to help poorer countries is to discourage restrictions on trade and immigration and encourage capital flows to countries that need them the most. And they have good reason to do so, as such policies would benefit rich countries as well.

NEW HAVEN – Until recently, we were regularly confronted with images of drowned migrants floating in the waters separating poorer countries from richer ones, from the Rio Grande to the Mediterranean. And although COVID-19 now dominates the news, the pandemic’s economic fallout is likely to exacerbate the global inequalities that drive migration.

America’s Compromised State

Saul Loeb/AFP

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A Silent Hero of the Coronavirus Crisis

March 17, 2020

Sometimes, no matter how hard one tries, and no matter how selflessly one sacrifices, one stands no chance against a more powerful enemy. The new coronavirus, COVID-19, has proved to be such a foe, and were it not for technology, the battle against it would have been lost by now.

NEW HAVEN – Not to diminish the superhuman efforts of nurses, doctors, and health-care workers worldwide, but sometimes, no matter how hard one tries, and no matter how selflessly one sacrifices, one stands no chance against a more powerful enemy. The new coronavirus, COVID-19, has proved to be such a foe. Were it not for technology, the battle against it would have been lost by now.
The Three Essential Questions about

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What Next for Global Trade?

January 10, 2019

In 2018, US President Donald Trump finally turned his protectionist words into action by imposing sweeping tariffs on imports from allies and adversaries alike. But while Trump’s use of tariffs to protect domestic industry is not new, his attacks on the larger trading system certainly are.

WASHINGTON, DC – The year 2018 marked the return of the import tariff. As of October, the United States had imposed levies on roughly 12,000 products, accounting for 12.6% of its total imports; its main trading partners had retaliated with tariffs on 2,087 products, accounting for 6.2% of US exports. With trade tensions mounting, many observers have warned of a full-scale trade war, or even the collapse of the global trading system.Of course,

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