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Kate Bahn, Carmen Sanchez Cumming



Articles by Kate Bahn, Carmen Sanchez Cumming

How the coronavirus recession is impacting part-time U.S. workers

1 day ago

The coronavirus recession continues to highlight and deepen the structural inequities that have long made the U.S. economy so fragile.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly Employment Situation Summary—also known at the Jobs Report—the unemployment rate fell from 14.7 percent in April to 13.3 percent in May and the economy recovered 2.5 million nonfarm payroll jobs. After prime-age employment experienced the steepest decline in history in April, the share of the population aged 25 to 54 that has a job rose to 71.4 percent in May.
But the Jobs Report also shows that May’s decline in joblessness was mostly driven by White workers, whose unemployment rate went from 14.2 percent in April to 12.4 percent in May. The unemployment rate of Hispanic workers also fell, albeit

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Equitable Growth’s Jobs Day Graphs: May 2020 Report Edition

2 days ago

Equitable Growth supports research and policy analysis on how trends in economic inequality and mobility and changes in the economy have affected the concentration of wealth, income, and earnings, and how these distributional shifts have affected the promise of economic security and opportunity. More

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JOLTS Day Graphs: March 2020 Report Edition

22 days ago

Every month the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics releases data on hiring, firing, and other labor market flows from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, better known as JOLTS. Today, the BLS released the latest data for March 2020. This report doesn’t get as much attention as the monthly Employment Situation Report, but it contains useful information about the state of the U.S. labor market. Below are a few key graphs using data from the report.

1.
The quits rate decreased sharply from 2.3% in February to 1.8% in March, as workers’ confidence about job prospects declined amid the public health crisis and requisite state shutdowns.

2.
While both the rates of job openings and hires decreased in March, openings did more so, leading to a slight increase

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Equitable Growth’s Jobs Day Graphs: April 2020 Report Edition

May 8, 2020

On May 8th, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released new data on the U.S. labor market during the month of April. Below are five graphs compiled by Equitable Growth staff highlighting important trends in the data.

1.
The employment rate for prime-age workers plummeted 10 percentage points, erasing all gains for those in their prime working years during the recovery from the Great Recession.

2.
The unemployment rates for black and Hispanic workers shot up to 16.7 percent and 18.9 percent, respectively, compared to a steep but less severe increase for white workers up to 14.2 percent.

3.
Jobs losses occurred across industries, with the greatest decline in leisure and hospitality, which shed 7.7 million jobs, or nearly half of all jobs in this sector.

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JOLTS Day Graphs: February 2020 Report Edition

April 7, 2020

Every month the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics releases data on hiring, firing, and other labor market flows from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, better known as JOLTS. Today, the BLS released the latest data for February 2020. This report doesn’t get as much attention as the monthly Employment Situation Report, but it contains useful information about the state of the U.S. labor market. Below are a few key graphs using data from the report.

1.
Two months prior to social distancing measures, the quit rate remained steady at 2.3%, reflecting confidence about the labor market before the unexpected decline in economic activity.

2.
The vacancy yield reflected a tight labor market with more job openings than hires taking place for the month of

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First Jobs Day report since the onset of the coronavirus recession exposes a U.S. labor market in crisis

April 3, 2020

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics this morning released its monthly Employment Situation Summary, the first Jobs Day report to capture just how hard the coronavirus recession is hammering the U.S. labor market. The new report, coming after yesterday’s towering 6.65 million Unemployment Insurance claims, means that after decades of rising economic inequality, the decline in the power of unions, and the erosion of the safety net, U.S. workers are going to be particularly unprepared for this sharp and sudden economic downturn.
Today’s Jobs Day report shows that after months of historically low unemployment, the unemployment rate climbed to 4.4 percent for the first time since August 2017. The share of the population that is employed dropped to 60.0 percent, a massive 1.1 percentage

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