Tuesday , September 21 2021
Home / Equitable Growth

Equitable Growth



Articles by Equitable Growth

Equitable Growth announces record $1.39 million in research grants for scholars examining economic inequality and growth

22 days ago

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth today announced its 2021 research grants, with funding of $1,392,795—a record-breaking level—awarded to 62 researchers. These scholars are studying the various channels through which economic inequality, in all its forms, impacts economic growth and stability.

For the past 8 years, Equitable Growth has funded economists and social scientists in various stages of their careers, including faculty members, postdoctoral students, and Ph.D. candidates at U.S. colleges and universities. This year’s cohort of scholars makes up the largest group of annual grantees in Equitable Growth history, with 48 academic and 14 doctoral grantees.

“The advances from every research grant will be invaluable to broadening our knowledge of the challenges and

Read More »

NBER Summer Institute 2021 Round-up: Week 3

August 2, 2021

On July 12, the National Bureau of Economic Research kicked off its summer institute, an annual 3-week conference featuring discussions and paper presentations on specific subfields of economics, including measuring poverty, the costs of climate change, and systemic discrimination among large employers. This year’s NBER event is being held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic and is being livestreamed on YouTube.

We’re excited to see Equitable Growth’s grantee network, Steering Committee, and Research Advisory Board and their research well-represented throughout the program. Below are abstracts (in no particular order) of some of the papers that caught the attention of Equitable Growth staff during the third and final week of the conference. Click here for a round-up from

Read More »

What recent data-driven research can tell policymakers about Black Women’s Equal Pay Day

August 2, 2021

Tomorrow is Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. This day recognizes that Black women in the United States have to work from the start of January 2020 through August 2, 2021 to earn as much as White men earned in 2020 alone. This fundamental fault line in the U.S. labor market is due to centuries of structural racism—the skeins of which remain glaringly evident today.

In this column, we look at what recent data-driven research tells policymakers and the U.S. public about this persistent income inequality. The scholars behind this body of research include Michelle Holder, the incoming president and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, several other leading women economists such as associate professor of economics at Bucknell University Nina Banks, and Equitable Growth

Read More »

NBER Summer Institute 2021 Round-up: Week 2

July 26, 2021

On July 12, the National Bureau of Economic Research kicked off its summer institute, an annual 3-week conference featuring discussions and paper presentations on specific subfields of economics, including wealth taxation and tax evasion, market structure and competition, and labor market inequalities. This year’s NBER event is being held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic and is being livestreamed on YouTube.

We’re excited to see Equitable Growth’s grantee network, Steering Committee, and Research Advisory Board and their research well-represented throughout the program. Below are abstracts (in no particular order) of some of the papers that caught the attention of Equitable Growth staff during the second week of the conference. Click here for a round-up from week 1, and

Read More »

NBER Summer Institute 2021 Round-up: Week 1

July 19, 2021

On July 12, the National Bureau of Economic Research kicked off its summer institute, an annual 3-week conference featuring discussions and paper presentations on specific subfields of economics, including inequality and the macroeconomy, intergenerational mobility, automation and the future of work, and occupational segregation. This year’s NBER event is being held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic and is being livestreamed on YouTube.

We’re excited to see Equitable Growth’s grantee network, Steering Committee, and Research Advisory Board and their research well-represented throughout the program. Below are abstracts (in no particular order) of some of the papers that caught the attention of Equitable Growth staff during the first week of the conference. Come back on

Read More »

Climate change among many issues discussed at annual Western Economic Association International conference

July 15, 2021

The Western Economic Association International at the end of June held its 96th annual conference, bringing audiences together for more than 280 concurrent sessions to collaborate, share, and learn from each other. From June 27 to July 1, economics professionals at all stages of their careers met virtually to discuss and present research in all areas and specializations of economics.

The conference touched on many topics, from inflation to competition to racial disparities in algorithms and earnings inequality, and featured skills-building and networking opportunities as well. Equitable Growth and its community of scholars and grantees were well-represented in this year’s WEAI programming, including:

Equitable Growth grantee Emi Nakamura of the University of California,

Read More »

How federal place-conscious policies can work to reduce regional inequality in the United States

June 23, 2021

Over the past four decades, geographic inequality between regions of the United States has grown dramatically. A handful of metropolitan areas, largely along the coasts, have become some of the richest economic regions—cohesive groups of counties linked by strong economic ties, such as those between a city and its suburbs—in world history.

At the same time, large swaths of the country have been trapped in economic decline, struggling with deindustrialization, stagnant wages, and rising unemployment. These economic challenges have contributed to a host of social and political challenges and have hamstrung the national economy by reducing investment in local economies, limiting aggregate demand, and reducing the effectiveness of federal economic policy.

Until recently, regional

Read More »

Weekend reading: Race and police use of force in the United States edition

June 17, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

The United States has a long history of disproportionately high rates of violence and mistreatment by police against Black communities. But the role of race in police use of force can be difficult to document, explains guest columnist CarlyWill Sloan at Claremont Graduate University, due in part to the assumptions researchers must make about unobserved

Read More »

Father’s Day highlights why paid paternity leave should be part of all U.S. parental leave policies

June 17, 2021

This Sunday is Father’s Day, a holiday in which we celebrate and acknowledge our relationships with fathers, grandfathers, father figures, and others in our lives who helped raise us. For some, this may be their first Father’s Day, but unfortunately for many new parents in the United States, paid leave after the birth or adoption of a child is anything but a guarantee.

Paid parental leave is one of the most fundamental ways to ensure workers can maintain a balance between professional responsibilities and family caregiving needs. Yet the United States is one of the only countries in the world that does not offer paid parental leave to all of its workers. Four in five private-sector workers in the United States and 95 percent of the lowest-paid workers—mostly women and workers of

Read More »

The future of work and worker power post-COVID a key topic at the 2021 Labor and Employment Relations Association annual conference

June 14, 2021

Last week, the Labor and Employment Relations Association, or LERA, held its 73rd annual conference. The virtual event, which took place over four days, featured more than 350 presenters from across disciplines, focusing on workers, worker power, and the workplace in a time of division and disruption. Speakers and participants from labor, management, government, advocacy, and academia attended the more than 85 sessions, from plenaries and workshops to skill-building and networking opportunities.

The interdisciplinary approach to the conference offered a chance for Equitable Growth and our network to deepen and broaden our network of scholars, as well as raise awareness of our work with representatives of diverse interests and fields. Equitable Growth grantees and

Read More »

Weekend reading: The impact of COVID-19 relief packages on the U.S. economy and workforce edition

June 11, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

After approving $5.3 trillion in coronavirus relief legislation since March 2020, policymakers in Congress are now debating whether to pass two additional medium- and long-term investment packages: President Joe Biden’s $2 trillion American Jobs Plan and $1.8 trillion American Families Plan. Many are wary of increasing spending and want to make sure the new

Read More »

Weekend reading: Studying the experiences of AANHPI communities in the United States edition

May 28, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

May is AANHPI Heritage Month in the United States, a period of time to commemorate the achievements and contributions of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Kate Bahn and Carmen Sanchez Cumming look into the intersectional wage divides facing AANHPI women in the U.S. labor market, broadening the research in this area, which often

Read More »

Weekend reading: The U.S. anti-austerity tradition edition

May 21, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

Amid increased government spending to combat the coronavirus and the ensuing recession alongside overblown fears of inflation, some policymakers are pushing for austerity and against additional public investments. But U.S. history shows that anti-austerity policies are proven to bolster and grow the U.S. economy equitably. Nic Johnson, Robert Manduca, and

Read More »

Weekend reading: Tax evasion in the United States edition

May 14, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

Tax Day 2021 is Monday, May 17. As many Americans prepare to file their tax returns and await their refunds, Corey Husak writes that some of the wealthiest Americans will engage in complicated tax evasion techniques to avoid paying their fair share—costing the U.S. government up to $700 billion this year, according to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. This tax

Read More »

Weekend reading: Jobs and unemployment more than a year into the coronavirus recession edition

May 7, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

As the U.S. economy begins to show signs of recovery from the coronavirus recession, it’s important to remember that many Americans are experiencing job displacement, where their prior positions no longer exist. This type of job loss occurs amid shifting economic and business conditions, such as business closures, corporate downsizing, or outsourcing, and is

Read More »

Weekend reading: We’ve got the evidence for those big plans edition

April 30, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

As David Mitchell writes, the American Jobs Plan and the American Families Plan, described this week by President Joe Biden in his address to Congress, would make large-scale, and in some cases permanent, investments in the nation’s physical and human infrastructure. These measures would combat racial, income, and wealth inequality, and they would restructure

Read More »

Equitable Growth’s second annual academic research report

April 29, 2021

An update on what we’ve learned from our funded academic research and the new questions we seek to answer

The Washington Center for Equitable Growth is a nonprofit research and grantmaking organization dedicated to advancing evidence-backed ideas and policies that promote strong, stable, and broad-based economic growth. For 7 years, our grant program has supported scholarly research at U.S. colleges and universities aimed at deepening our understanding of how inequality affects economic growth and stability.

We place a priority on research that is relevant to policy debates, abetting the development of evidence-based policies. Equitable Growth’s in-house team of more than 40 staff helps bridge the gap between researchers and the policy process, engaging policymakers, as

Read More »

Overheating is not a concern for the U.S. economy

April 26, 2021

Critics of President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan and further public investments financed through a combination of tax increases and deficit spending—such as his administration’s proposed American Jobs Plan, at roughly $2 trillion, and the forthcoming American Families Plan—often argue that the U.S. economy will “overheat” if policymakers pump too much support into the U.S. economy too quickly.

Yet plans for further public investments should be judged primarily on the merits of those investments. Arguments that the U.S. economy will overheat ignore the need for additional investments in the economy and rely on the possibility of future policy errors to argue against needed investments today.

This factsheet explains how economists and policymakers

Read More »

Weekend reading: Inequities in U.S. taxation and homeownership edition

April 23, 2021

This is a post we publish each Friday with links to articles that touch on economic inequality and growth. The first section is a round-up of what Equitable Growth published this week and the second is relevant and interesting articles we’re highlighting from elsewhere. We won’t be the first to share these articles, but we hope by taking a look back at the whole week, we can put them in context.

Equitable Growth round-up

Shaun Harrison delves into the many ways the nation’s local, state, and federal tax systems discriminate on the basis of race and exacerbate racial income and wealth disparities. Economists Carlos Fernando Avenancio-León at Indiana University Bloomington, an Equitable Growth grantee, and Troup Howard at the University of California, Berkeley find that for

Read More »

Factsheet: What does the research say about the economics of paid leave?

April 22, 2021

The United States is the only advanced economy in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development that does not guarantee any paid family and medical leave to its entire workforce. Though 10 U.S. states and localities have currently implemented or have begun to implement programs for their residents, there is no nationwide paid family and medical leave plan that covers all workers across the country regardless of where they live or work.

As a result of this policy choice, U.S. workers, their families, and their employers often lack the resources and support they need during a family transition or health shock, including the arrival of a new child, an aging parent, a diagnosis of an illness, and personal injuries. When paid leave from work to deal with and adjust to

Read More »

Factsheet: What does the research say about care infrastructure?

April 15, 2021

The United States is emerging from the greatest health, economic, and caregiving crises in a century. Many policymakers are looking for ways to jumpstart the economy and, recognizing the tie between infrastructure and economic growth, have turned their sights on investments in U.S. physical and care infrastructure.

In March 2021, President Joe Biden proposed the American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan, a multipart proposal that would boost federal spending on the nation’s care and physical infrastructure. (See textbox for details.) Investments of this kind could help the U.S. economy recover from the coronavirus recession and lead toward sustainable, broad-based economic growth in the future.

Care infrastructure in the American Jobs Plan and American

Read More »

Investing in an equitable future

April 14, 2021

The United States faces four converging and overlapping challenges—a public health crisis and resulting economic one, a reckoning over structural racism, and the worsening effects of climate change—all of which require substantially greater public investment to overcome. Indeed, a growing body of research finds that declining public investment is damaging to U.S. communities and the overall strength of the economy because older infrastructure depreciates, and economic and social challenges go unaddressed.

The debate over the size and reach of recently proposed investments to restore and transform the U.S. economy is shaped, in part, by the nation’s weak and unequal recovery from the Great Recession more than a decade ago. There is ample evidence that the inadequacy of the

Read More »

Executive action to improve U.S. economic measurements

March 3, 2021

Relevant federal offices and agencies

White House Office of Management and BudgetInteragency Working Group on Equitable DataBureau of Economic Analysis, Department of CommerceOffice of Tax Policy, Department of the TreasuryRelevant laws and Executive orders

Internal Revenue Code, Section 5103(j)Executive Order On Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government (Executive Order #13985)
Overview

The rise of economic inequality over the past four decades has changed the U.S. economy in fundamental ways. Unfortunately, the data that our federal statistical agencies produce to measure the nation’s economic progress has not kept up with these structural changes. At the same time, historical racial economic disparities

Read More »

Executive action to combat wage theft against U.S. workers

February 24, 2021

Relevant federal offices and agencies:

Wage and Hour Division of the U.S. Department of LaborRelevant laws:

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. § 203)
Overview

Wage theft against U.S. workers exacerbates the long-run problem of low and stagnant wages. When companies commit wage theft, they impoverish families and deprive workers of the just compensation for their hard work, robbing workers of the value they contribute to economic growth and exacerbating economic inequality.

The odds that a low-wage worker will be illegally paid less than the minimum wage ranges from 10 percent to 22 percent, depending on overall economic conditions, and each violation costs that worker an average of 20 percent of the pay they deserve. Women, people of color,

Read More »

Executive action to reform the cost-benefit analysis of U.S. tax regulations

February 24, 2021

Relevant federal offices and agencies:

Office of Information and Regulatory AffairsU.S. Department of the TreasuryRelevant laws and guidance:

Executive Order 12866Memorandum of Agreement, Review of Tax Regulations under Executive Order 12866
Overview

Beginning in April 2018, the federal government required a cost-benefit analysis for many more tax regulations than it had in the past. More than 2 years later, it is clear this experiment in cost-benefit analysis of tax regulations failed. The cost-benefit analyses released alongside regulations implementing the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 provide little information relevant to assessing the merits of those regulations. Moreover, while tax experts criticize many of the TCJA regulations for providing unmerited

Read More »

Executive action to coordinate antitrust and competition policies across the federal government

February 19, 2021

Relevant federal offices and agencies:

National Economic CouncilCouncil of Economic AdvisersOffice of Information and Regulatory Affairs, or OIRAOffice of Management and BudgetDomestic Policy Council
Overview

The U.S. economy is plagued by a problem of excessive market power, stemming, in part, from years of weakened competition and antitrust enforcement. Growing market power disrupts the operation of free and fair markets, and harms consumers, businesses, and workers. It exacerbates inequality and compounds the harms of structural racism.

But it is not too late to change course. A bold vision—one that relies on Congress reengaging on competition policy, the antitrust enforcement agencies adopting an affirmative agenda to strengthen deterrence, and the

Read More »

Executive action to coordinate federal countercyclical regulatory policy

February 17, 2021

This factsheet has been adapted from Yair Listokin’s Vision 2020 essay and his 2019 book, Law and Macroeconomics: Legal Remedies to Recessions.

Relevant federal offices and agencies:
• National Economic CouncilRelevant laws:• Executive Order 12835, Code of Federal Regulations

Overview

Traditional macroeconomic tools—fiscal policy from the U.S. Congress and monetary policy from the Federal Reserve—are critical but not sufficient responses to the current coronavirus recession. To round out the federal government’s actions to deal with the ongoing economic downturn, executive agencies should consider how their regulatory power can be aggressively leveraged to provide a much-needed, countercyclical boost to the ailing U.S. economy. Regulatory actions that encourage

Read More »

ASSA Round-up: Day 3

January 6, 2021

Today was the final day of the three-day annual meeting of the Allied Social Science Associations, which is organized by the American Economic Association. The conference, held virtually this year, featured hundreds of sessions covering a wide variety of economics and other social science research. We’ve already posted the abstracts of some of the papers that caught the attention of Equitable Growth Staff during Day One and Day Two, as well as links to the sessions at which they were presented. Following are additional papers from the first two days as well as some from today’s final slate of sessions.

“The Effect of Unfair Chances and Gender Discrimination on Labor Supply”

Nickolas Gagnon, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Kristof Bosmans, Maastricht University,

Read More »

ASSA Round-up: Day 2

January 5, 2021

Today was the second day of the three-day annual meeting of the Allied Social Science Associations, which is organized by the American Economic Association. The conference, held virtually this year, features hundreds of sessions covering a wide variety of economics and other social science research. Below are some of the papers and presentations that caught the attention of Equitable Growth staff during the second day (as well as more from yesterday). Included below are the abstracts from those papers as well as links to the sessions at which they were presented. Check out the highlights from yesterday as well, and come back after tomorrow’s program for more highlights.

“Assessing the Impacts of Paid Family and Medical Leave Laws on Employers: Insights from Surveys of

Read More »

ASSA Round-up: Day 1

January 3, 2021

Today was the first day of the three-day annual meeting of the Allied Social Science Associations, which is organized by the American Economic Association. The conference, held virtually this year, features hundreds of sessions covering a wide variety of economics and other social science research. Below are some of the papers and presentations that caught the attention of Equitable Growth staff during the first day. Included below are the abstracts from those papers as well as links to the sessions at which they were presented. Come back tomorrow evening for more highlights.

“Sharing is Caring: Inequality, Transfers and Growth in the National Accounts”

Marina Gindelsky, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Abstract: Using the updated Distribution of Personal Income by the

Read More »